Tag Archives: Healthcare

Rotman Evening MBA’s Impact on a Healthcare Professional

Healthcare professionals find the depth and breadth of management knowledge, and the flexibility of Rotman’s Morning & Evening MBA programs particularly attractive. In today’s guest blog post, current Evening MBA student and healthcare professional Jia Inacio shares her experience so far in the program, and why the Rotman MBA works for her.

Jia Inaco, MBA '17

Jia Inacio, MBA ’17, MRT(R)

“I completed my Bachelor’s education specialised in Radiation Sciences at the University of Toronto. Currently I am working in Princess Margaret as a Breast Cancer Imaging Expert. My work is involves imaging guided breast cancer detection and diagnosis. I take pride in helping women, addressing their personal concerns, as well as providing timely treatment.

“My days are often from 8 am to 4 pm with slight variations. Unlike many other clinicians who may have to work in shifts, mine are fairly fixed. On my own time, I enjoy learning and self-improvement, which led me to pursue several professional development courses and the UHN emerging leaders program. At the same time, I seriously looked into master’s programs that would be a right fit for my career goals.

Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

“I knew I wanted to keep working as I pursued further education because keeping my professional skill and experience fresh was important to me. Also, I love the tangible impact I am making battling breast cancer.

Reputation, convenient location, doable schedule and powerful network

Welcome to the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.

Welcome to the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.

“Rotman’s part-time MBA degree is an attractive option due to its reputation, convenient location, and outstanding alumni network. Having met a couple of Rotman alumni, and encouraged by my husband, I decided to apply to the part-time MBA program. The evening MBA program appeals to me, because it fits around my work schedule. I can work, go to school, and still have my weekends. Every Tuesday and Thursday, I’d finish at Princess Margaret, get home quickly to my little puppy, and then walk over to Rotman for class by 6:30pm. Most times, I’d be home around 9 or 9:30pm, and be able to have a late dinner before heading to bed.

“My classmates are one of the best parts of my Rotman experience. I have classmates who work in finance, IT, telecom, aerospace and so on. I get to discuss ideas with fresh new perspective all the time. In the beginning, I had doubt in my ability to compete in this elite group. However, I found that we are all aiming for the same goal: to get better together and to seek knowledge, which makes this education experience great. Learning aside, I have made great friends along the way.

Beyond the classroom

“Outside of the regular school schedule, I am also a member in two student societies. Last year, I was able to participate in a case competition. My goal for the next year is to take on more projects as well as to join more case competitions.

“The benefit of choosing to do my MBA at Rotman is already shining through. I find that I can often apply what I have learned in the classroom into work and my personal life. I’ve led a hospital wide open house event, made several work environment improvements, started my personal blog in helping women to seek breast health knowledge, and am now applying for a research fellowship for allied health professionals. Post Rotman, I hope to stay in the healthcare sector. My clinician experience together with my business management knowledge would help me to identify needs and bring tangible benefits to patients. I am a dedicated healthcare professional and am proud to be a part of the Rotman community.”


Students and alumni in Rotman’s Morning & Evening MBA programs for working professionals come from all industries, including healthcare. At Rotman, they’re able to bring together their industry experience with new management knowledge to make big impacts in the global community. Read about some of our Rotman MBA students and graduates – where they’ve been and where they are now.

If you’re interested in learning more about our MBA programs and how they might fit your career, please fill out our contact form. We’d love to hear from you. We also have opportunities for you to experience what it’s like to be a Rotman MBA student with events like our upcoming strategy sample class on May 31, 2016.

StrategyatRotman-160531

The topic will be Aligning the Stars: Using Systems Thinking to (Re)Design Canadian Healthcare. We invite you to attend and look forward to meeting you.

Redesigning Canadian Healthcare: Rotman Major in Health Sector Management & Sample Class

How can we redesign, and improve, Canadian healthcare? Without question, in our current environment of changing demographics and population demands, every healthcare system on the planet has room for improvement. At the Rotman School, we are aware of the important challenges and questions faced by healthcare professionals and managers worldwide. With a view to making meaningful impact on the industry, our Major in Health Sector Management is designed to help tackle these issues and work towards creating world class healthcare systems.

Through this major you can study important topics such as: the commercialization of life-science products, the role of the private sector in the industry and performance management, governance and control. You’ll also be able to learn about such areas as Health Sector Strategy and Organization, Pharmaceutical Strategy and Healthcare Consulting. Whether you are a physician looking to refine your management skills or a healthcare administrator looking to gain specialized knowledge in your field, this may be a great option for you.

Jia_Inacio_MBA

Jia Inacio, Evening MBA 2017

Jia Inacio (Evening MBA 2017) and Rishie Seth (Evening MBA 2017) are both healthcare practitioners benefiting from Rotman’s close research ties to the health sector. With Rotman’s Morning or Evening MBA programs, working professionals have the option to accelerate their careers and work on their MBA at the same time. Jia works at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Rishie is a physician at St Joseph’s hospital; both students agree that this program will help them make an impact on the future of their organization and the healthcare system in Ontario.

Rishie_Seth_MBA

Rishie Seth, Evening MBA 2017

Wondering about the actual classroom experience? We have the perfect opportunity for you to sample an MBA class on May 31, 2016. We invite to attend and meet us at our sample class Aligning the Stars: Using Systems Thinking to (Re)Design Canadian Healthcare.

StrategyatRotman-160531

This sample class will open your eyes to different ways of thinking about a management problems and will point you to system thinking as a tool to redesign healthcare systems and healthcare organizations. You will learn from none other than Professor Brian Golden, Vice-Dean, Professional Programs and the Sandra Rotman Chaired Professor in Health Sector Strategy at the Rotman School of Management, The University of Toronto, and The University Health Network.

The sample class is based on his research with the Veterans Administration’s Health System in the U-S. – a publicly funded health system remarkably similar to those in Canada. Professor Golden will reveal the levers that leaders of health systems and healthcare organizations can use to move from woefully under-performing to world class.

Professor Brian Golden

If you are a healthcare professional interested in expanding and deepening your knowledge of the health sector and tackling common management challenges, or you are interested in growing your strategic thinking, we would love to meet you at this sample class! Register to Aligning the Stars, and we look forward to seeing you on May 31.

Do you have any questions? Contact us or leave us a note below!

A Day in the Life: Rotman Morning MBA

Adam Cohen, Morning MBA '16

Adam Cohen, Morning MBA ’17

Ever wondered what it’s like to be a full-time working professional who also attends classes part-time two mornings a week as a Morning MBA student? We asked Adam Cohen, Morning MBA 2017 and Nursing Unit Administrator at Mount Sinai Hospital to walk us through a typical day.

4:00 – 7:00 am. I wake up at 4:00 am, have breakfast and head to the gym. At 6:00 am I will finish up my work-out and get ready to head to Rotman.

Morning MBA

7:00 – 9:00 am. Class starts at 7:00 am, so I arrive at 6:45 am and chat with my classmates until then. During class, professors involve students’ experiences and perspectives to explain theoretical concepts. I find this the most beneficial aspect of the program. By 9:00 am class is over and everyone heads out to start their day.

9:30 am – 12:00 pm. My work day starts at 9:30 am, when I head out to my team at Mount Sinai Hospital and see what events have transpired overnight or that morning. At 10:00 am I check my emails and continue to work on projects. This is where I see the benefits of the Morning MBA program taking place as I apply what I’ve just learned that morning to my work. Here is an example: upon review of my surgical floor, I discovered that I require an additional regular full-time employee. Due to the new government funding reform, my organization requires rational for any new hire. Using my knowledge from the course, I am able to accurately articulate the net present value of this position. Applying new learnings to my daily activities is an extremely beneficial strategy to reinforce the lesson that took place earlier in the day. It also shows senior leadership that my decisions are based on sound knowledge

Morning MBA

12:00 pm. At noon I will sit down an eat lunch with colleagues where I share about what I’m currently learning, and future social gatherings organized through my Rotman network. My colleagues are shocked to hear that class starts at 7:00 am and at how early I wake up. I chuckle and remind them that I arrive to work at 6:30 am on a day when I don’t have class. So starting at 7:00 am is actually a 30 minute sleep in!

12:45 – 5:30 pm. After lunch I go back to my units and connect with the team leader. This is often followed by leadership meetings. I believe I have developed in my role due to my time at the Rotman Morning MBA program. I am asking questions and thinking in a way I typically would not have prior to the program. I am speaking with more confidence at work, which resulted in my manager asking me to take on projects that are beyond my current scope of practice, and that have wider organizational impacts.

5:30 pm. I finish up for the day and start my walk home, checking my messages and group chats with my friends and teammates from Rotman.

6:30 – 9:30 pm. It is dinner time and I watch a mindless show to relax. Once dinner is over I catch up on phone calls and personal emails. Reading the Rotman’s GBC weekly article is very helpful for me to gauge the different events that are occurring at school. Finally, I’ll review my notes and put a plan in place to complete my homework over the weekend or work on my group responsibilities to ensure they are complete prior to meeting up.  Given that I wake up at 4:00 am, I like to go to bed early; so at 9:30 pm I turn on my alarm and hit the sack in order to wake up and start my day bright and early!


Are you a morning person? Tell us what are your strategies to get your day moving and how these help you be more productive!

Back to School with the Rotman Morning & Evening MBA

Rotman Morning & Evening MBA Class of 2018 Orientation

Rotman Morning & Evening MBA Class of 2018 Orientation

It’s back to school! Getting a jump-start on the academic year, our new class of 2018 Rotman Morning & Evening MBA students officially commenced the program with an intensive week of classes last week. Students also got the chance to get to know each other and Rotman staff at an overnight Orientation event held mid-August.  As working professionals, our part-time MBA students know the value of maximizing time to balance their personal lives and to accelerate their career. Regular classes that take place twice a week in the morning from 7:00 – 8:59AM before work or after 6:30PM in the evening, depending on the MBA program of choice, will begin after Labour Day.

Our Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018 is incredibly strong and diverse. A few highlights:

  • The Morning MBA class of 2018 is our largest cohort for this program, ever.
  • 37% of this Morning & Evening MBA cohort are women; in the Morning MBA program, women represent 44% of the class. With an industry average of 30% women in MBA programs, this is certainly very exciting and encouraging news!
  • 12% of candidates in our part-time MBA programs are employed in the healthcare field. This indicates a growing recognition of need in the healthcare industry for strong leaders who also intimately understand its unique challenges.
Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018 profile.

Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018 profile.

We’re privileged to be able to walk with these ambitious working professionals on their MBA journey. Good luck!

Meeting everyone for the first time during the Rotman Morning & Evening MBA Orientation

Meeting everyone for the first time during the Rotman Morning & Evening MBA Orientation

Academic Director Professor Doug Hyatt welcomes Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018.

Academic Director Professor Doug Hyatt welcomes Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018.

Team building during Orientation - Rotman Morning & Evening MBA

Team building during Orientation

Having lunch together during the first day of classes. Rotman Morning & Evening MBA

Having lunch together during the first day of classes.

Alexa Gilbert, MBA ‘16: Bridging the Gap Between Science and Business

Alexa Gilbert, Rotman MBA '16, Senior Manager, Clinical Development, Assurex Health

Alexa Gilbert, Rotman MBA ’16, Senior Manager, Clinical Development, Assurex Health

During the day, Alexa Gilbert is the Senior Manager, Clinical Development at Assurex Health and, in the evening, she is a student at our part-time MBA program. Alexa chatted with us about the benefits of having an MBA in the healthcare field and what led her to choose the Rotman MBA program.

Tell us a bit about your professional background and what led you to apply to Rotman?

I grew up in Montreal where I obtained my MSc in Experimental Medicine at McGill University.  About 3 years ago, I was looking to advance in my career – at the time I was working for a contract research organization (CRO), which is an entity that pharmaceutical companies typically hire to manage their clinical trials. I moved to the greater Toronto area when I landed a job in Burlington that was still in the CRO sector, but had greater responsibilities than my previous position. I had already been thinking about doing my MBA for a few years. Knowing that Rotman’s MBA program is the best program in Canada, I decided to apply. The opportunity to tap into a network that has such a great reputation; it’s priceless!

What do you think about the need for MBAs in healthcare? What is your advice to someone in healthcare who is thinking about MBA?

I don’t know if the MBA is appropriate for everyone, but it is a good way to open your eyes beyond your particular field, in my case that of life sciences. From my experience in graduate school, you are often focused on your own one research topic and you can easily forget that there is a bigger world out there. The MBA gives you a broader perspective and can help you transition into a managerial role by helping you develop management skills that can be used in the healthcare industry.

You mentioned a lot of research stays in academia, while the point of this research is to benefit humanity as a whole.

Yes, this is why I always say: I am doing my MBA to help bridge the gap between science and business. There is a great demand for people with skills in both areas. Once you’ve done the research, then you have to get the commercialization part right – to make it viable so that people can benefit from the discoveries. I think it can be beneficial even for people who already have their PhD or MD. The MBA is an additional tool.

You said that there is a demand for the MBA in the healthcare setting. Is this demand more than before and why do you think that is?

The demand is definitely growing. It is not often you will see people in healthcare with an MBA. Having a science degree means you have the ability to research, evaluate, and critically interpret and analyze data while an MBA provides you with the business acumen you need for knowledge translation and commercialization of those innovations.  The innovations, through commercialization, will eventually improve public health and provide more effective health services to strengthen the healthcare system. 

Final question – Where do you see your career going? How do you envision the MBA helping you with your career?

I would not have secured my current position at Assurex Health without the MBA experience and support from the amazing career services. Even if I am not using everything I’m learning in the MBA program, I am conscious that the concepts exist and I perform in a way that is most beneficial for the entire company and shareholders rather than just for myself or my projects.  That means I am thinking more strategically about which projects I take on as well as about how these tie in with the company’s priorities and resources.  As I continue to learn and get exposed to different facets of the biotech industry, I am hoping to become a resource for innovators that are trying to bring their novel technologies to market.


If you want to discuss whether the Rotman part-time MBA is a right fit for you, fill out this contact form with your details. Our admissions team would happy to hear from you.

Healthcare and the Rotman MBA Spotlight: Vanessa Perry, Morning MBA ‘18

Healthcare is a large and growing industry in Canada and internationally, and offers opportunities for MBA graduates to make a real difference in people’s lives.

Vanessa Perry,  MBA '18, Public Health Practice Advisor, Standards and Performance at the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

Vanessa Perry, MBA ’18, Public Health Practice Advisor, Standards and Performance at the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

One of our most recent Rotman Morning MBA candidates accepted into the program to start this August is Vanessa Perry, Public Health Practice Advisor, Standards and Performance at the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Her impressive experience to date has earned her one of our new Women in Business Excellence Entrance Awards. She chatted with us over coffee about her experiences, and her decision to enter the Rotman MBA program.

Congratulations on your admission to Rotman and on your award! Tell us about your professional background.

I work for the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care in health policy planning. Currently, my emphasis is on performance management and organization management in public health.

My background is in research. I have a Masters degree in Epidemiology which is the study of population health. It is the basis of health research and involves a lot of bio statistics. Before working with the Ministry, I specialized in Aboriginal health, and worked in the North managing research sites for an international research project looking at youth resilience.

Vanessa in Labrador, Newfoundland, Canada

Vanessa in Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada

Recently, I took a leave of absence from the Ministry and spent a year working at an NGO running the monitoring and evaluation of a UN funded sanitation project as a professional volunteer. I was in Tanzania for the first year of the five year project, helping them set up a nationwide monitoring and evaluation system. I have a background studying international development and had never gotten to apply it. So it was a great opportunity to use some of those skills.

Vanessa shopping in Zanzibar, Tanzania

Vanessa shopping in Zanzibar, Tanzania

How do your earlier experiences tie back to what you’re doing at the Ministry of Health?

After completing my Masters degree and working in Labrador, I came back to Toronto and started working with the Ministry, I moved away from straight science and research into policy, planning and system management.

At the Ministry, I do a lot of performance management: how do you look at health systems, how do you evaluate them, how do you manage them to make them better?

So how does the MBA fit into your experiences?

I want to be a leader in the healthcare sector and to have influence in shaping its direction. I view business management skills as essential for me to move up and to be in a position to help create the strongest and most sustainable healthcare system that we can.

Why Rotman?

I’m happy with my career trajectory, and I didn’t want to stop working. Part-time was a natural place to go. Plus, Rotman at U of T is a top school in my backyard, with the great option of the Morning MBA program.

The Morning MBA program immediately made a lot of sense to me. In high school and university I rowed competitively, so I used to get up very early so I know I’m capable of doing that. It’s a great set up: it’s only two mornings a week and Rotman also has a health management specialization.

In my area of healthcare, there is some debate if a Masters of Health Administration or an MBA makes more sense. For me, the MBA provides a broader perspective. The ability to be in a class with people from so many different professional backgrounds – to be able to learn from them – had a lot of appeal. So even though I’m interested in the healthcare specialization, I don’t want to have my blinders on. I want to be in a class with people from different backgrounds, learn what they’re thinking and how they approach things.

What advice do you have for women thinking about the MBA?

I’m a second generation female Rotman student – my mother did the Rotman MBA, also on a part-time basis, when there were very few women taking that step. So for me, it has never been an emphasis of whether you’re a man or a woman, but on pursuing what you want and need professionally. That said, I believe that women can bring something special to the table as strong, collaborative leaders and communicators and, considering the low representation of women in MBA programs, should be proactively encouraged to pursue them. It’s really amazing to me what we can accomplish.

Thanks for your time, Vanessa. Final question – is there anything else that you’re particularly looking forward to during your time at Rotman?

One of the things that I most look forward to is the networking – to take advantage of the community that Rotman provides. During the application process, I got to sit in on a healthcare-related workshop. To have access to those conversations and events beyond the classroom, I find that really energizing!


To learn more about the Rotman Morning & Evening MBA, attend one of our admissions events, or contact us to chat one-on-one. We would be happy to speak with you!