Tag Archives: MBA

Students in session

Grow with the Rotman Self-Development Lab

The Self-Development Lab (SDL) is an incredible resource for Rotman students to participate in to develop and nurture the communicative, interactive and interpersonal skills essential to be a collaborative problem solver and decision maker in the workplace.

Unique to Rotman, the SDL offers an extensive schedule of workshops designed to help you express yourself effectively, understand your own motivations and those of others, and achieve your goals in complex, high-stakes environments. You will receive personalized feedback on your behavioural performance, communication style, and personal presence in a series of intensive, individual coaching sessions and small group workshops.

The skills developed within the SDL are the perfect compliment to the knowledge and set of technical, analytical and targeted problem solving skills (both know-what and know-how) that are the main areas being developed in the classroom.

Self-Development Lab; Re-engineering patterns of expressive, communicative and interactive skills, and of one's own understanding of self

Since the launch of the Lab, our students have consistently reported learning some of the most impactful and valuable skills in their student experience for the real world.

You can learn more about the Self-Development Lab on our website.

Maja Djikic, PhD., Director, Self-Development Lab, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Maja Djikic, PhD., Executive Director, Self-Development Lab, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

 

The SDL is directed by Maja Djikic, PhD. She is a psychologist specializing in the field of personality development and was a post-doctoral fellow with Desautels Centre for Integrative Thinking (Rotman School of Management) and Psychology Department at Harvard University.

 

 

Canada’s Demographic Challenge – How you can take the lead

A demographic challenge is fast looming for Canada. As our population ages, a whole new set of societal, business and political challenges arise, where currently no ideal solution exists. These challenges aren’t limited to just our country – they are also occurring in Western Europe and countries such as China.

demographic challenge

We spoke with Doug Hyatt, Professor of Business Economics here at the Rotman School of Management to get his view on Canada’s demographic Challenges, and how you can take the lead.

Could you tell us a little bit about the main demographic challenge that Canada faces today?
Canada’s challenge of an aging population is a critical issue because unlike other challenges that we face in the economy, what’s happening with demographics is not something that you can fix by increasing interest rates or choosing other short-term tools common in government economic policy. Really, this is a long-term challenge.

How is this topic relevant to prospective MBA students?
This topic is important to those learning to become leaders because this isn’t something that we’ve encountered before. For example, current challenges in the workplace – the way that companies finance their retirees’ benefits or where they source new workers – are issues that we’ve never dealt with before. Ultimately, solutions need to be headed by a new generation of leaders.

Is there a particular industry that will be affected more than others?
If you think about this from the perspective of “how do I make money?” it’s really hard to know who the winners will be. You may think of investing in the retirement home business, but the problem will come in 15 to 20 years when the generation of baby boomers has passed. You’ve got to think about what your business model is 15 years after that. So, it’s a harder question to answer than you’d think.

Do you think that high-skilled immigration to Canada is going to offset the issues associated with an ageing population?
That’s another important issue to address in conjunction with this topic. There’s a lot of competition for new immigrants and Canada regularly doesn’t meet its quota. Everyone wants young people who are highly educated and entrepreneurial; unsurprisingly, these people want to bring the rest of their family, including their parents. So, if you look at the demographic profile of immigrants to Canada, it doesn’t look very different from Canada’s population make up.

Any advice to business leaders and prospective students regarding this topic?
I would suggest that they familiarize themselves with the popular press. There’s a lot written about saving for retirement, myths about working longer, and intergenerational conflict. This will help them understand how this demographic challenge is already affecting their personal, professional and political life and can help them think of ways to address these issues.


On January 20th, 2016 meet Professor Doug Hyatt and learn about this critical topic that will affect your future and the world of business. Register and attend his sample class on the nature and implications of Canada’s evolving demographic.