Tag Archives: Toronto

6 Master’s Programs, 1 Open House

Rotman's Annual Open House. Join us November 6, 2016.

Rotman’s Annual Open House. Join us November 6, 2016.

Rotman’s Open House 2016 – mark your calendars!

Rotman’s Annual Open House takes place on Sunday, November 6, 2016. Check out all six of our Master’s programs to see which program is the right fit for you. It’s the perfect day! Attend an information session, sample a class, try your hand at a trading simulation, and meet current students and alumni.

MBA programs at Rotman

Specialized degrees at Rotman

Don Tapscott, CEO of the Tapscott Group and one of the world's leading authories on the impact of technology. He is also an Adjunct Processor at the Rotman School of Management.

Don Tapscott, CEO of the Tapscott Group and one of the world’s leading authorities on the impact of technology. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the Rotman School of Management.

Don Tapscott, keynote

Our exciting keynote speaker is Don Tapscott, CEO of The Tapscott Group. He is one of the world’s leading authorities on the impact of technology on business and society. He has authored over 15 books including Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything which has been translated into over 25 languages.

Don’s most recent and ambitious book was co-authored with his son, startup CEO and bitcoin governance expert Alex Tapscott. Blockchain Revolution: How the Technology Underlying Bitcoin is Changing Business, Money and the World was published in May 2016 and is, according to Harvard Business School’s Clay Christensen, “the book, literally, on how to survive and thrive in this next wave of technology-driven disruption” and, “likely to become one of the iconic books of our time.”

In 2015, Don became a member of the Order of Canada, and was ranked the 4th most influential management thinker in the world by Thinkers50. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Rotman School of Management, an Associate of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, and Chancellor of Trent University in Ontario. Don is the Founder and Executive Director of the $4M Global Solution Networks investigation of multi-stakeholder models for global problem solving and governance.

It is hard to imagine anyone who has been more prolific, profound, and influential in explaining today’s technological revolutions and their impact on the world.

Register now to meet Don and our Master’s admissions teams on November 6, 2016 at Rotman’s Annual Open House.

Master of Finance: June 11-13, 2016 in review

What a busy couple of weeks at Rotman for our recently graduated Master of Finance class of 2016 and current MFin students! More than just in the classroom, our alumni, students, faculty and staff rubbed shoulders (and noisemakers) outside of school.

On June 11, 2016, we had our third annual friendly soccer match with Schulich’s and Smith’s MFin classes. Trophy goes to Smith this year. Well played!

The day after on June 12, we had our pre-convocation MFin reception where valedictorian Morgan Pampe gave a rousing and at times, emotional retrospective of the class over the past 20 months.

Finally, the big day! On June 13, the MFin class of 2016 officially became Rotman alumni.

Check out the photos below.

2016 Master of Finance Soccer Match

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Rotman Master of Finance Class of 2016 Convocation Reception

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Rotman Master of Finance Class of 2016 Convocation

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Rotman Master of Finance: A Wealth of Surprises

Today is convocation day for the Rotman Master of Finance Class of 2016! Congratulations. Our newly graduated Rotman MFin Class of 2016 is now armed with a new way to think about finance and management that will transform their careers as finance leaders.

Morgan Pampe, MFin ’16, CFA is the class of 2016’s valedictorian. He was drawn to the program for career reasons. What came as a welcome surprise was the wealth of experiences that Rotman makes possible: the professors, the case competitions, the speaker series, and most of all, the friendships. Here is a conversation we recently had with him.

Morgan Pampe, MFin '17, CFA

Morgan Pampe, MFin ’17, CFA

How does it feel to be finally done?

It’s nice to have a lot more free time. And since the weather has improved, it’s doubly uplifting. However, I do miss coming back to Rotman because I made so many great friends here.

Something people don’t appreciate or understand about the Master of Finance program is the closeness of the friendships you form here. As the program is so intensive, you end up spending a lot of your free time at the School, working on challenges together. It’s like when you’re younger and you’re doing everything together at the cabin, or going on a canoe trip.  I really enjoyed that aspect, because I was a camper and I like that idea of closely bonding with people.

That was something you didn’t expect.

Like most people, I was drawn to the program for career reasons. With regards to that, it was the right choice. But I had no idea of how much I’d like everyone in class. There are people from all sorts of different backgrounds, in terms of the country they’re from, or their professional experience or education. You get great perspective on many different things. You’re all going through the same process of working and doing school, so there’s a lot of empathy. People are smart and ambitious, and there’s also a sense that we’re all in it together.

Aside from the friendships you made, what’s the biggest take away from your experience?

I couldn’t imagine how smart the professors would be. I’d learn something in, let’s say, John Hull’s or Peter Christoffersen’s class, and the next day I would be doing it at work and showing people. I would get some blank stares or head nods, and they’d be, “That’s good.  We’ve never done that before. Keep doing that.”  I got to see how worthwhile the program is in real time.

Coming out as a graduate, you feel confident in talking to anybody about their job or their line of business. If you don’t understand it, you know how to find out. The program gives you the tools and confidence to dig deeper.

 If you were to talk to someone just entering the program, what advice would you give?

I would point out that Rotman has so much to offer. The professors are great. There’s a wonderful stream of smart people and ideas and knowledge that flow through here. There’s an incredible speaker series that brings in heads of state, professionals and industry leaders to come and share their ideas.  There’s an incredible alumni network, and always someone willing to sit down and talk to you.

That said, the opportunity is fleeting. Time is passing. It’s up to you to have the discipline to constantly try to get as much out of it as possible.  It’s like a wet towel and you need to just squeeze as much as you can out.  How hard you’re willing to do that is in your hands.

Edited. Full conversation with Morgan can be found here.


Are you interested in investing in your career with the Rotman MFin? Contact us or visit our website for more information. We’d love to hear from you.

A Day in the Life: Rotman Morning MBA

Adam Cohen, Morning MBA '16

Adam Cohen, Morning MBA ’17

Ever wondered what it’s like to be a full-time working professional who also attends classes part-time two mornings a week as a Morning MBA student? We asked Adam Cohen, Morning MBA 2017 and Nursing Unit Administrator at Mount Sinai Hospital to walk us through a typical day.

4:00 – 7:00 am. I wake up at 4:00 am, have breakfast and head to the gym. At 6:00 am I will finish up my work-out and get ready to head to Rotman.

Morning MBA

7:00 – 9:00 am. Class starts at 7:00 am, so I arrive at 6:45 am and chat with my classmates until then. During class, professors involve students’ experiences and perspectives to explain theoretical concepts. I find this the most beneficial aspect of the program. By 9:00 am class is over and everyone heads out to start their day.

9:30 am – 12:00 pm. My work day starts at 9:30 am, when I head out to my team at Mount Sinai Hospital and see what events have transpired overnight or that morning. At 10:00 am I check my emails and continue to work on projects. This is where I see the benefits of the Morning MBA program taking place as I apply what I’ve just learned that morning to my work. Here is an example: upon review of my surgical floor, I discovered that I require an additional regular full-time employee. Due to the new government funding reform, my organization requires rational for any new hire. Using my knowledge from the course, I am able to accurately articulate the net present value of this position. Applying new learnings to my daily activities is an extremely beneficial strategy to reinforce the lesson that took place earlier in the day. It also shows senior leadership that my decisions are based on sound knowledge

Morning MBA

12:00 pm. At noon I will sit down an eat lunch with colleagues where I share about what I’m currently learning, and future social gatherings organized through my Rotman network. My colleagues are shocked to hear that class starts at 7:00 am and at how early I wake up. I chuckle and remind them that I arrive to work at 6:30 am on a day when I don’t have class. So starting at 7:00 am is actually a 30 minute sleep in!

12:45 – 5:30 pm. After lunch I go back to my units and connect with the team leader. This is often followed by leadership meetings. I believe I have developed in my role due to my time at the Rotman Morning MBA program. I am asking questions and thinking in a way I typically would not have prior to the program. I am speaking with more confidence at work, which resulted in my manager asking me to take on projects that are beyond my current scope of practice, and that have wider organizational impacts.

5:30 pm. I finish up for the day and start my walk home, checking my messages and group chats with my friends and teammates from Rotman.

6:30 – 9:30 pm. It is dinner time and I watch a mindless show to relax. Once dinner is over I catch up on phone calls and personal emails. Reading the Rotman’s GBC weekly article is very helpful for me to gauge the different events that are occurring at school. Finally, I’ll review my notes and put a plan in place to complete my homework over the weekend or work on my group responsibilities to ensure they are complete prior to meeting up.  Given that I wake up at 4:00 am, I like to go to bed early; so at 9:30 pm I turn on my alarm and hit the sack in order to wake up and start my day bright and early!


Are you a morning person? Tell us what are your strategies to get your day moving and how these help you be more productive!

CFA Ethics Challenge: Third Win for Rotman Master of Finance

CFA Ethics Competition Winners 2016 - Rotman Master of Finance

CFA Ethics Challenge Rotman Master of Finance winning team. L-R Johnny Wu, Nicole Jiang, Elizabeth Ren and Michael Kim (CNW Group/CFA Society Toronto)

Congratulations to the Rotman Master of Finance winners of the annual CFA Ethics Challenge! This is the third consecutive year that Rotman students achieved first place, competing against students from Schulich, Queen’s Smith School of Business, and the University of Ottawa’s Telfer School of Management.

The CFA Ethics Challenge is organized to encourage the development of analytical and ethical skills required to tackle real-life challenges in the workplace. We asked winners Elizabeth Ren, Nicole Jiang, Michael Kim and Johnny Wu from the Master of Finance 2017 winning team to tell us about their experience.

Congratulations on winning this competition! How do you feel about bringing it home for the third year?

We are so proud (and also relieved, phew!) to bring home the top honor for the third year in a row, especially since Rotman was hosting the challenge this year. We all strongly believe in the importance of ethics for financial professionals. With the bloom of compliance and the regulatory industry, Rotman has taken the leadership in educating financial practitioners in this area. Our very own MFin Program is a strong evidence of this.

Where there other resources that you tapped into to prepare for this challenge?

While academic courses provided us insights into ethics in the finance world, mandatory and optional professional development modules offered by the Rotman MFin program really gave us an edge. The dynamic Teams Workshop showed us how powerful we can be if we value each other’s input and truly collaborate with each other; the Presentation Skills Workshop sharpened our skills and enabled us to present effectively in front of the CFA Society of Toronto. We worked extremely hard to dissect the complicated case, and now we know that all those Sunday practices and late online meetings were worth it! This experience has been more than rewarding and we are so grateful to have had the opportunity to participate in this challenge.

Did you reach out to your external network outside of your team?

We could not have done this without the support from last year’s winning team (Michael Szaura, Sheng Fei, Mahtab Faruqui and Roger Brown). We are so thankful for Roger taking time on a Saturday afternoon to coach us. Special thanks to our former and current MFin Academic Directors Alexandra MacKay and Fotini Tolias, and Reema Chaudhry our MFin programs Assistant Director,  who not only encouraged us but also provided much guidance.


If you’re interested to learn more about the Rotman Master of Finance program, visit our website at www.rotman.utoronto.ca/MFin or contact us. Our next MFin deadline is February and we look forward to reviewing your application.

Tip: the earlier you apply, the greater your chance of an entrance award.

Back to School with the Rotman Morning & Evening MBA

Rotman Morning & Evening MBA Class of 2018 Orientation

Rotman Morning & Evening MBA Class of 2018 Orientation

It’s back to school! Getting a jump-start on the academic year, our new class of 2018 Rotman Morning & Evening MBA students officially commenced the program with an intensive week of classes last week. Students also got the chance to get to know each other and Rotman staff at an overnight Orientation event held mid-August.  As working professionals, our part-time MBA students know the value of maximizing time to balance their personal lives and to accelerate their career. Regular classes that take place twice a week in the morning from 7:00 – 8:59AM before work or after 6:30PM in the evening, depending on the MBA program of choice, will begin after Labour Day.

Our Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018 is incredibly strong and diverse. A few highlights:

  • The Morning MBA class of 2018 is our largest cohort for this program, ever.
  • 37% of this Morning & Evening MBA cohort are women; in the Morning MBA program, women represent 44% of the class. With an industry average of 30% women in MBA programs, this is certainly very exciting and encouraging news!
  • 12% of candidates in our part-time MBA programs are employed in the healthcare field. This indicates a growing recognition of need in the healthcare industry for strong leaders who also intimately understand its unique challenges.
Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018 profile.

Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018 profile.

We’re privileged to be able to walk with these ambitious working professionals on their MBA journey. Good luck!

Meeting everyone for the first time during the Rotman Morning & Evening MBA Orientation

Meeting everyone for the first time during the Rotman Morning & Evening MBA Orientation

Academic Director Professor Doug Hyatt welcomes Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018.

Academic Director Professor Doug Hyatt welcomes Rotman Morning & Evening MBA class of 2018.

Team building during Orientation - Rotman Morning & Evening MBA

Team building during Orientation

Having lunch together during the first day of classes. Rotman Morning & Evening MBA

Having lunch together during the first day of classes.

Back-to-Back Top Honours with CFA Master of Finance Ethics Challenge

For the second year in a row, a Rotman MFin team won the CFA Master of Finance Ethics Challenge. Congratulations to the Rotman MFin team of Roger Brown, Mahtab Faruqui, Sheng Fei and Michael Szaura!

Rotman winners of 2015 CFA Master of Finance Ethics Challenge Michael Szaura, Sheng Fei, Mahtab Faruqui and Roger Brown.

Left to right: Rotman winners of 2015 CFA Master of Finance Ethics Challenge Michael Szaura, Sheng Fei, Mahtab Faruqui and Roger Brown.

Planted last year as a result of a conversations between the Rotman, Schulich and Queen’s Master of Finance programs, the 2015 second annual ethics challenge saw MFin teams from the three schools again competing for top honours.

Case competitions like this is an incredible way to take theory beyond the classroom. “Presenting my work to my classmates was a good first step. That is because the answer was not simply A, B or C,” says Michael. “And this time I got to present my analysis to the president of the CFA Society. ”

Sheng continues, “All my team members signed up immediately after I pitched the case competition. All of us believe strongly in the value of ethics education, and the importance of promoting the highest ethical standards in the investment profession. As financial professionals we are faced with ethical dilemmas on a daily basis and this competition helped us sharpen our tool kit to analyze and resolve ethical situations effectively.

“We received tremendous support from the Rotman family. The faculty and staff are extraordinarily supportive and resourceful. We owe much of our success to the fantastic coaching from both last year’s winning team (Tony Chan, Akshat Gupta and Angel Liu) and two highly accomplished MFin alumni (Miranda Fong and William Cheng). The team worked extremely hard and we are very proud to have brought back the top honour once again to Rotman.”

We’re delighted with the team’s win and are looking forward to next year’s challenge.


If you’re interested to learn more about the Rotman Master of Finance program, visit our website at www.rotman.utoronto.ca/MFin.

Contact us for more information or to start your MFin September 2015. You may also contact Breanna Brooks, Assistant Director of Admissions directly. We would love to meet with you!

Rotman team lends our hands for Evergreen, Yonge Street Mission

In the spirit of sharing and giving back, last evening, the Rotman Morning & Evening MBA and Master of Finance working professionals team donated to and volunteered with the Evergreen centre, a part of Yonge Street Mission.

We helped to prepare and serve a warm and delicious meal to street-involved youth. Led by the amazing, kind and organized staff at Evergreen, everything came together beautifully.

Rotman career coach Marnie Consky, MFin recruitment assistant director Breanna Brooks and Managing Director Elizabeth Duffy-MacLean prepping a mouthwatering salad and tasty dessert.

Career coach Marnie Consky, MFin recruitment assistant director Breanna Brooks and managing director Elizabeth Duffy-MacLean prepping a mouthwatering salad and tasty dessert.

Rotman career coach Annette Filler waiting on kitchen orders from Evergreen staff Vlad.

Career coach Annette Filler waiting on kitchen orders from Evergreen staff Vlad.

Rotman staff shredding seafood for the luscious paella.

Shredding seafood for the luscious paella.

Salad and dessert prep

Finished salad!

Paella vegetables cooking

Dessert

As the scrumptious meal of paella served with a colourful salad was cooking, we went on a tour of the facilities. The Evergreen centre’s compassionate work is manifold. There’s a career centre, art therapy, housing advocates, a nursery, a full-medical centre with facilities for dental work, eye care and other medical necessities, and so much more.

Evergreen nursery.

Evergreen staff chatting about the nursery.

We’re so thankful to have had this opportunity to lend a hand to such an inspiring organization in our city!

The Evergreen centre for street involved youth is a unique place where youth between the ages of 16 and 24 can access employment services, warm meals and supports including an on-site nursery.

Powerhouse Mix & Mingle: Annual Rotman MFin Casino Night

Every year, the Rotman Master of Finance program organizes the popular Rotman MFin Casino Night Mix and Mingle. It’s a fabulous opportunity for current MFin students, alumni, faculty and staff to meet together for a fun and casual night. Current students take the opportunity to meet their seniors, alumni touch base with friends made during their time at Rotman, and faculty mix and mingle with all.

Check out photos from our last Rotman MFin Casino Night Mix and Mingle on Thursday, November 6, 2014.

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An MBA post-mortem from a real estate guy

Brandon Donnelly is a real estate developer, internet entrepreneur, blogger and Rotman MBA alumnus.

As a recent graduate of Rotman’s Morning MBA program (and presumably because somebody over there reads my blog), I was asked to write a guest post for their MBA blog. More specifically, I was asked to share my thoughts on the real estate industry and on my time at Rotman. And since I haven’t really done a post like this before, I thought it would be worthwhile to do.

My city pt 2 by JR F

But before I begin, I think it’s important to explain a bit about my background and my motivations for doing an MBA in the first place. Before going to Rotman, my first master’s degree was in architecture and real estate from the University of Pennsylvania. Basically it was a Master of Architecture combined with their MBA real estate concentration. So it included everything from real estate finance to real estate development.

Having already done this 3-year program, there were a couple of things I wanted out of an MBA program. First of all, I wasn’t prepared to go full-time. Five years out of the workforce was simply too high of an opportunity cost for me and so part-time was all I considered. I also only applied to Rotman because I didn’t want to waste anytime traveling outside of the city (or to other parts of the city). I also saw Rotman as a rising star and one of, if not the, best option in Canada.

At the same time, I didn’t give much thought to the real estate curriculum being offered even though I fully planned to stay working in the real estate industry. I felt like I already had that sort of formal training and so, unlike some of my classmates who were looking to switch into real estate, I was after something else. I ended up majoring in Innovation & Entrepreneurship.

What I was trying to do was really round out my skillset and fill in some of the missing holes: accounting, marketing, and so on. But even more importantly, I had drunk the kool-aid around Rotman’s focus on integrative thinking (renamed “business problem solving”) and “design thinking”. And since there will always be a part of me that thinks of itself as a designer, it seemed like the perfect program for me.

Because at the end of the day, it’s not that hard to learn how to create a real estate development pro forma or calculate your expected exit cap rate on some piece of real estate. That stuff is all fairly mechanical. It might seem quite mythical when you don’t know how to do it, but once you do, you quickly realize that a financial model is only as good as the assumptions you put in. As we’re told in school, garbage in = garbage out.

The real value gets created in the assumptions. It’s created in the way you think about the market, your product, and your customers. And a lot of the time, the most value is created when you know or believe something that nobody else believes to be true. If you’re a lemming, you’re going to get lemming like returns and outcomes. So in a lot of ways, I went to Rotman to help me think better and think differently.

In some industries, resting on your laurels can kill you in a relatively short period of time. See Blackberry. Real estate, on the other hand, is generally a bit slower moving. But that doesn’t mean that change doesn’t happen and that there isn’t room for loads of innovation.

Just look at the Toronto of today versus the Toronto of 10-15 years ago. We’ve transformed ourselves into a city of high-rises where more and more people now want to live in the core of the city. This has brought commercial landlords back to the city center so that employers have downtown office space to attract the best human capital (see South Core) and it’s brought suburban retailers into the core to sell to these same urbanites. We’re seeing a complete reversal of the trends experienced with the last generation.

Amidst all of this, I’ve been noticing a growing awareness and passion around cities. My blog Architect This City started as a forum for architects, planners, and developers, but it has grown into a community of thousands of people who simply love cities. They’re passionate about everything from architecture to grade-separated bike lanes (as geeky as that probably sounds).

So I think that it’s not only the real estate market that’s changing, but also the professions involved with it. I’ve written a lot about the future of the architecture profession because I think we’re starting to see the emergence of new business models. Architects are becoming developers and developers are starting to become much more heavily involved in the shaping of the communities in which they build. Which is why in many ways, I think of my self as a city builder more than anything else.

Finally, to make matters even more complicated, technology is starting to have a huge impact on the business. Zillow.com just bought Trulia.com for $3.5 billion to form a portal that will now serve around 1/4 of the online US residential market. And Opendoor.com is getting ready to launch a product that seems entirely poised to disrupt the way homes are bought and sold in America.

So what I’m getting at is that there’s absolutely no guarantee that the way we used to do something, is the way we’re going to continue doing it. In fact, I operate under the assumption that everything can and will be changed by somebody at some point. And if this is the way you approach things, then it should become abundantly clear to you that being able think critically is going to be one of your most important assets.

When I was just starting at Rotman, I met for lunch with an upper year classmate who told me that one of the best things he’s taken away from the program is the ability to think about the way he thinks. That may sound silly to some, but in our uncertain world, it’s actually a great skill to have.

Image: Flickr